What Pet Should I Get?

Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, died in 1991, leaving behind boxes and boxes of stuff. Soon after his death, his widow, Audrey, packed most of it and shipped it away for proper archiving. Around 2013, Seuss’ longtime assistant Claudia Prescott called Cathy Goldsmith, a publisher at Random House. She had found something very special – a treasure trove of drawn cartoons on onion paper with typed text, taped precisely into place on each page. The fragile originals were to be the book “What Pet Should I Get” by  Dr. Seuss. The writing and drawings were complete, but still required some art decisions, backgrounds and shading.

“I tried to do the job he would do if he were doing it today,” said Goldsmith. “I also wanted it to be a piece that, when somebody looked at, they would know it is a Dr. Seuss book.” Goldsmith started working on Dr. Seuss books in 1978. She remembers the first time she met the author, a tall, imposing figure with a wicked sense of humor. She had no idea what to call him. “No one else called him Dr. Seuss,” said Goldsmith. He finally noticed that she was awkwardly avoiding using his hame and told her to call him Ted.

Goldsmith would end up working with Ted for the next 11 years. Toward the end of his life, when he was too ill to finish coloring in the final pages of “Oh, the Places You’ll Go!,” he called Ms. Goldsmith. She flew out and stayed at his home for several days, coloring under his direction.

“What Pet Shall We Get” was written some time between 1958 and 1962, a time when pets were spoken about a bit differently than we do today. Goldsmith tweaked the script to encourage people to adopt, rather than buy, pets.

Dr. Seuss was an animal lover. His first “pet” was a brown stuffed toy dog given to him by his mother. He named the dog Theophrastus. He would keep Theophrastus for the rest of his life. The stuffed dog was often seen perched near his drawing board. Just before he died, at the age of 87, Dr. Seuss gave Theophrastus to his stepdaughter Lea Grey. “You will take care of the dog, won’t you?” he asked her.

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Theodor Seuss Geisel and his first “pet” a stuffed dog.

Ted (Dr. Seuss) got his first real live dog around 1914 when he was 10 years-old. Rex was a Boston Bulldog who had a habit of walking on three of his four feet. Perhaps this habit inspired Dr. Seuss to create odd-legged animals in his books.

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Rex, a Boston Bulldog, was Ted’s first real live dog.

Ted and his wife Helen loved big dogs. In this photograph, Cluny sits with Ted by the pool at their home in La Jolla, California in 1957. This was around the time that Random House published Dr. Seuss’s 13th book, “The Cat in the Hat.”

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Cluny checks out some of Dr. Seuss’s drawings.
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At the beach, Helen and Cluny watch as Dr. Seuss draws a creation in the sand.

After Helen died, Ted remarried. His second wife, Audrey, loved small dogs. This is Ted and Samantha, a Yorkshire Terrier, the first of several Yorkies he and Audrey lived with over the years. Photobombing Ted and Sam is one of his creations – a Semi-Normal-Green-Lidded Fawn.

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Sam would be one of several Yorkies who lived with Ted and his second wife Audrey.

Dr. Seuss wrote over 60 books, beginning in 1931. “Green Eggs and Ham” was his biggest seller with 17.5 million copies sold, to date. “The Cat in the Hat” is next with 15.5 million copies sold to date. When “What Pet Should I Get” was released on July 28, 2015, 200,000 copies were sold in the first week, making it the fastest-selling picture book in Random House Children’s Books history.

One Dog At A Time.

In 2006, during a tour of duty in the Afghanistan town of Now Zad, Royal Marine Sergeant Pen Farthing helped break up a dogfight. Located in Helmand Province, this was an area once described as the most dangerous place on Earth. Pen could not resist the soulful eyes of one of the street dogs he saved, whose ears had been cut off for fighting. He ended up befriending the dog and named him Nowzad.

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Pen Farthing and Nowzad.

After his tour of duty ended, Pen went through a difficult process to bring Nowzad home to the UK. He quickly realized that he wasn’t the only one hoping to do the same. Pen founded NOWZAD, and soon began the process of reuniting dogs with the soldiers who had befriended them in war zones around the world, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Ukraine, Kuwait and Libya. Through donations, happy homecoming destinations have included USA, UK, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Holland, Italy, Spain, Jordan and South Africa.

Seven of the rescued street dogs have become fully fledged service dogs in the United States. The dogs are a much valued and loved lifeline to their veterans who have been diagnosed with PTSD. That these dogs endured a war zone like their handlers only strengthens the connection and understanding.

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Nate, reunited with Hannah through the efforts of NOWZAD. Hannah is now Nate’s service dog.

“As the troop sergeant in Afghanistan, I was there to motivate the guys and get them fired up again to go out and do the job. But no one was doing that for me,” said Pen. “My time with this dog was a way of de-stressing, collecting my thoughts and popping my head back in the game.”

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Lexi, moments after being rescued. Sadly, Staff Sergeant David P. Day, 26 of Gaylord, MI, later gave his life in service with Fox Company, 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion, during combat operations in Badges Province, Afghanistan, April 24, 2011.

Hope For Animals In A War-Tone Region. The charitable organization has reunited more than 900 dogs and cats with the soldiers. NOWZAD also runs the only animal shelter and clinic of its kind in all of Afghanistan. Currently, it is home to around 150 dogs, 40 cats and six donkeys. The modern veterinary clinic is staffed by a team of Afghan nationals. In addition to animal welfare education, NOWZAD’s mission at the clinic is the prevention of the spread of rabies. They are also implementing a humane trap, neuter, vaccinate and return program in Kabul for cats.

Who Rescued Whom? Often, the brave men and women serving their countries in war zones around the world, find themselves adopting a stray dog or cat struggling to survive. The animals end up providing a respite from war; a moment of peace, home and love. Leaving them behind, after their tour of duty is over, is unthinkable for many of these soldiers. NOWZAD arranges for the dog or cat to safely get to the Nowzad clinic where shelter and care are provided. They spay/neuter all rescues and provide any other required medical attention as well as vaccinations. Then, they carry out all necessary checks and paperwork to ensure the animal will arrive to its final destination, back in the arms of its loving warrior.

NOWZAD’s Policy Statement On The Import Of Dogs. There has been an increase of press speculation in reference to the irresponsible importation of dogs in the UK and the US. “It has been reported that more than 30,000 dogs were brought into the UK from the EU alone, with the majority coming from Romania, Bulgaria and Lithuania; many of which are via puppy traffickers or negligent organizations that do not adhere to the strict regulations that are required to import a dog or cat into the UK. Irresponsible dog importation poses a health and safety threat not only to the dog itself, but to other dogs and humans it may come into contact with. Many of the dogs imported are not a typical domesticated dog that easily integrates into a household environment; a fact not always communicated fully to a new owner,” states NOWZAD on its website.  While there have been numerous calls to prevent this international rehoming as standard practice, NOWZAD adds. “Whilst a complete ban would be unfavorable to us as it would prevent us reuniting soldiers with the dogs or cats, we strongly advocate the need for tighter regulations to prevent rogue importers who are detrimental to the hard work of reputable and responsible animal charities like ourselves.”

Cathy Kangas, who sits on the Board of NOWZAD says of Pen, “He has shown that one person can have an amazing impact, bringing good to an environment written off by many. NOWZAD is demonstrating what can be achieved when people from all walks of life and cultures cast differences aside and work toward a common goal.”

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November, 2011/JFK Airport. With the help of American Dog Rescue, NOWZAD was able to make this emotional reunion possible between Adam and his battle buddy Freedom.

The New Barker dog magazine was first introduced to Pen Farthing and NOWZAD in 2011 by Florida’s own Arthur Benjamin of American Dog Rescue. Pen has written the bestseller “One Dog at a Time, Saving the Strays of Helmand.” The NOWZAD charity has support from animal lovers all over the world, including Ricky Gervais, who  donated the profits from one of his warm-up gigs, earlier this year. The warm-ups took place ahead of Gervais’ national tour of his stand-up show, appropriately called Humanity.

Why Do We Need National Dog Fighting Awareness Day?

 

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Today, April 8, 2017,  is National Dog Fighting Awareness Day. The activity may seem out of place in our society, where dogs are considered family members. It’s also a felony offense in all 50 states.

Dog fighters often have dark and violent pasts, even though they may come from diverse social and economic backgrounds, investigators say. Doctors, lawyers, teachers and professional athletes have been arrested in federal animal-fighting busts in recent years. One characteristic all of these people have in common is a love for brutality and money.

Florida has a reputation for having a “prevalent” dog fighting problem even though detailed statistics don’t exist. It’s such a covert operation that it’s hard to measure. What is known, for sure, is that big money drives the industry, especially in breeding “bloodthirsty” bloodlines. Buyers in large operations pay between $5,000 and $10,000 for puppies in a champion bloodline. Of course, there is also money in the fight itself. Dog fighters are also motivated by power, according to Mark Winton, a criminal-justice lecturer at the University of Central Florida.

National Dog Fighting Awareness Day isn’t just another way to fill a calendar box; it’s a necessary measure to help stop one of the most horrific forms of animal abuse imaginable.

The following is an excerpt from a journalist’s account, who went undercover during a dog fight: “The crowd’s roar dulled to a hum as the next two fighters appeared. The previous match had been short, as one contestant quickly outmatched his opponent, mauling him badly and tearing off an ear. But this final fight matched two highly respected and feared combatants. They eyed each other warily as their handlers finished corner preparations. Spectators came to the edge of their seats, and fathers lifted children to their shoulders for a better view as the judge stepped to the center, called the dogs to their scratch lines and yelled, “Let ’em go!” A cheer arose as the dogs charged across the pit and violently slammed into each other, teeth flashing as they sought a vulnerable target.

The dogs came apart once, when the brindle appeared to give up, and turned for a moment. They were returned to their scratch lines and held. Both dogs were breathing hard and bleeding. “Let ’em go,” the judge called again. If the brindle failed to attack now, he would lose. But he was a game dog, and responded to an instinct bred into him over generations and nurtured through training. As the brindle charged across his line, his opponent’s handler released him with the encouragement, “Finish him, Bo.”

Tired and weakened by his wounds, the brindle was slow to meet Bo’s ferocious attacks. Bo grabbed the brindle’s right front leg in powerful jaws, bit and twisted. The “snap” of breaking bone was heard as the brindle was flipped onto his back, while Bo sought a better grip on his opponent’s throat. Remarkably, as the judge ordered the handlers to break the dogs, the brindle tried to crawl after Bo, still intent on fighting. His handler gently wrapped him in a blanket, saying, “No more, boy. It’s over.”

Writer Matthew Bershadker wrote in a Huffington Post blog, three years ago: “It’s not enough to see dog fighting as just a crime. Society discourages, yet tolerates a number of crimes – some are even glorified. But dog fighting is a deep stain on our national character, a cultural embarrassment we should all feel. This is not about just locking up bad guys; this is about doing everything we can to bring this nightmarish practice to an end. We can’t rest until it does. That’s why National Dog Fighting Awareness Day isn’t just another way to fill a calendar box; it’s a necessary measure to help stop one of the most horrific forms of animal abuse imaginable.”

To report dogfighting, call the following tip line: 1.877.TIP.HSUS

Here is a link for possible signs of dog fighting:

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“If You See A Risk And Walk Away…

Then hope you never have to say, I could have saved a life that day, But I chose to look the other way.” From a poem by Don Merrill, “I Chose To Look The Other Way.”

by Anna Cooke, Editor-in-Chief of The New Barker dog magazine.

We have a problem in this state. Call it whatever you want: pet overpopulation. Blame it on the irresponsible public, if you’d like. It has reached epic proportions in Miami-Dade. Law enforcement and government officials are turning the other way, saying it’s not their job, not in their pay grade, not in their circle of knowledge.

Small bands of animal advocates are stepping in, but it’s only a bandaid. The problem is growing, and dogs are dying as a result.

Dogs are being dumped in an area known as the Redland Rock Pit. Volunteers with organizations like the Redland Rock Pit Abandoned Dog Project are trying to help the dogs by either capturing or feeding them have witnessed cars driving up, doors opening to let a dog out, then driving away. In one heartbreaking scene that played out just last week, a German Shepherd Dog chased after his owner’s car. The dog stood on the corner as the white car took off. A volunteer with Racing 4 Rescues coaxed the dog, now named Brady, safely into her car. Racing 4 Rescues volunteers were already in the area with the goal of pulling a momma (another German Shepherd Dog) and her two pups to safety.

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Momma and her two pups in the Redland Rock Pit area. Photography by Jaime Wald Seymour-Newton of JSN Photo/Animal Rescue.

 

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Her puppies were pulled. But, momma eluded volunteers with Racing 4 Rescues.

Miami-Dade Animal Services is crowded – at capacity. Same story, different town. This, in spite of a grand opening in June 2016 of the brand new Miami-Dade Animal Services Pet Adoption and Protection Center. “The new Pet Adoption and Protection center is a significant accomplishment for our pet loving community and will help Animal Services continue to save lives,” said Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez. “We built the best facility to help ensure every pet gets adopted, offer more low-cost spay/neuter services and enrich our life-saving programs,” he added.

Yet, in a response to the Redland Rock Pit problem, the Mayor sent this email last year, around the same time: “The shelter has rescued over 1100 strays from the Redlands/Homestead/Florida City area in this time period (three years). ASD continues to stand ready to respond to any issues identified by volunteers and asks all individuals to provide specific addresses and locations so that they can respond and follow-up on stray animals or cruelty issues.”

Mayor Gimenez, emails and phone calls are going unanswered. The dumped dogs, many of whom are unaltered, are left to fend for themselves. They are breeding, adding to the problem. Cruelty issues include dogs being sacrificed in Santeria rituals. Death by poisoning, or from being hit by cars. Starving to death.  Have you seen some of the cruelties, Mayor?

Welcome to Miami, Florida (warning – graphic images within this video)

Meanwhile, people and businesses from outside your community are coming in to help, donating time, services and food. Resources that could be used to help shelter pets and the pet overpopulation problems in their own communities.

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Food, donated by Pet Food Warehouse of St. Petersburg, is loaded onto a truck bound for Miami.
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Yoho Automotive & Towing, owned by Danielle Yoho – also the founder and president of Racing 4 Rescues.

But, your situation, Mayor Gimenez, has moved people to want to help, because it is a problem that belongs to all of us. And yet – no word from anyone in your offices, Miami-Dade Animal Services or law enforcement. Tell us, please, what should your constituents do? What can we, as concerned Florida animal advocates, do? We would love to speak with you. We’d love to hear your take on the situation. It is only going to get worse. My email address is anna@thenewbarker.com

Contact the office of Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez: mayor@miamidade.gov Call 305.375.1880.

Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners:

District 1 – Commissioner Barbara J. Jordan: district1@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5694

District 2 – Commissioner Jean Monestime: district2@miamidade.gov; 305.375.4833

District 3 – Vice Chairwoman Audrey M. Edmonson: district3@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5393

District 4 – Commissioner Sally A Heyman: district4@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5128

District 5 – Commissioner Bruno A. Barreiro: district5@miamidade.gov; 305.643.8525

District 6 – Commissioner Rebeca Sosa: district6@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5696

District 7 – Commissioner Xavier L. Suarez: district7@miamidade.gov; 305.669.4003

District 8 – Commissioner Daniella Levine Cava: district8@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5218

District 9 – Commissioner Dennis C. Moss: DennisMoss@miamidade.gov; 305.375.4832

District 10 – Commissioner Javier D. Souto: district10@miamidade.gov; 305.375.4835

District 11 – Commissioner Joe A. Martinez: district11@miamidade.gov; 305.375.5511

District 12 – Commissioner Jose “Pepe” Diaz: district12@miamidade.gov; 305.375.4343

District 13 – Chairman Esteban L. Bovo, Jr.: district13@miamidade.gov; 305.375.4831

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Brady, the dog left behind in front of witnesses at Redland Rock Pit, is in the caring hands of volunteers at Racing 4 Rescues. He has tested HW negative and is receiving treatment for skin issues.

What’s So Super About Sunday?

This Sunday in America is Super Bowl Sunday. It’s the New England Patriots vs. the Atlanta Falcons. Earlier this year, Michael Vick made a triumphant return to the Georgia Dome, riding onto the field in a convertible to a raucous ovation. According to a story in USA Today, Vick received by far the loudest ovation from the sellout crowd of 70,835 during a ceremony honoring the final regular-season game at the team’s home of 25 years. This, despite an online campaign calling for the Falcons to revoke their invitation over a 2007 dogfighting case that sent Vick to prison for nearly two years. A decade after his final game with Atlanta, the animosity that Vick’s name once stirred among Atlanta fans appeared to have turned to forgiveness. Not one boo or jeer was heard from the crowd.

The End Of An Era? “There are a lot of people who forgave me,” said Vick before the game. “It gives me another opportunity to show a different side of myself. I’m just thankful I have a lot of supporters.”

And this from Arthur Blank, Falcons owner, “Mike obviously has a great history with us, a great history with the franchise, an important player in our history. Michael represented an important part of my ownership period. I think our fans, based on the response I saw and felt, I think our fans were excited to have him as well.”

Gone But Never Forgotten. Two dogs from Vick’s dogfighting ring Bad Newz Kennels passed away  this month. Best Friends reported that Denzel died on January 10, 2017, nine years after he came to live at the sanctuary.

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Denzel with Best Friend veterinarian Dr. Patricia Patterson.
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Dogtown caregiver Paul Lindley with Denzel.

 

From Denzel’s obituary, Best Friends wrote: “Denzel was a fighter, but not in the way that NFL player Michael Vick wanted him to be. This brave dog fought against the trauma of his past to find happiness and friendship at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary. He also fought against serious health issues that threatened to take him down, time and again. He suffered from a strain of the blood parasite babesia, which is spread among dogs forced to fight by way of bites. It can be managed but not cured, and each bout takes an increasing toll.”

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Oscar and Rachel Johnson.

Another Victory Dog rescued from Bad Newz Kennels in 2007, passed away on January 15. Oscar lived with Rachel Johnson since 2012. This was posted on Oscar’s Facebook page: “Friends, on Sunday, I let Oscar go. I’ve watched his bad days start to overshadow the good. So Sunday, we had breakfast in bed, read and cuddled, went to the drive-thru for cheesy burgers…” Oscar’s Facebook page is here.

Michael Vick’s playing days are over. “I’m very content with my career and what I’ve been able to accomplish. I’m ready to move forward in life.” Vick has recently expressed an interest in coaching.

 

Every Dog Happens For A Reason.

angel_2091-copyMeet Angel, the newest addition to The New Barker staff. Like Bailey, the dog in the movie A Dog’s Purpose,  we’re clueless as to what Angel’s purpose is at the moment. We’re not even certain what compelled us to adopt a puppy at this stage in our lives. It’s been 18 years since we’ve raised one, and evidently our memory bank was devoid of all that is involved. Maybe it has something to do with her name, given to her before we adopted her from VIP Rescue Florida in Clearwater. Divine intervention for two broken hearts?

Our home, over the last 10 years, was complete with four dogs. As editor of The New Barker dog magazine, there are many opportunities for dogs to cross my path, increasing the odds of falling in love, over and over again. In A Dog’s Purpose, Bailey falls in love over and over again with a different human. Without love, after all, what is the purpose of life?

While attending this year’s Florida Gulf Coast Classic Clusters dog show with a dear friend, she mentioned why she enjoyed coming to the show so much. “I love watching you interact with the dogs, because every dog you see, it’s as if it’s the first time you’ve ever seen a dog.”

Over the course of eight months during this past year, we lost our two Cockapoos, Zoe and Chloe. They had been a big part of our lives for 18 years, and boom, just like that, we were a family of four – two humans and two canines.

One of the reasons it’s so difficult getting over the loss of a dog is the simple fact that they are so dependent on us. They won’t “grow up” and develop a new circle of friends, go off to college, establish a career and start families. They leave us only when their time is up, whenever or however that may be. Their departure opens a space in the heart that may never be filled. But, what if, having known that one dog, a place is opened in the heart to make room for more love, compassion, faith and hope? Room for another dog, whose purpose may not be clear at first.

With it’s cool soundtrack, A Dog’s Purpose is not just a story about dogs. It’s as much a story about humans, with our foibles, our loneliness and our ability to forgive and love again. Yes, it’s a love story that will make you laugh and cry, then laugh again, which is exactly what dogs do.

While Angel’s purpose may not be clear to us, for now, she is helping to mend a pair of broken hearts. And, at present, that’s all we can ask of a nine-week old puppy.

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Angel’s Adventures will be a weekly feature of The New Barker blog, so be sure to sign up. Follow The New Barker on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest for a cuteness overload of Angel as we follow her growth and discover just what her purpose in our lives will be.

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Treat Me Right.

Rawhide is a dangerous treat, given unknowingly by pet parents to their dogs. It is not, as many folks believe, the by-product of the beef industry nor is it made of dehydrated meat. It is actually the by-product of the leather industry. Producing rawhide begins with the splitting of an animal hide, usually from cattle. The top grain is generally tanned and made into leather products, while the inner portion, in its “raw” state, goes to the dogs. Harmful chemicals, glue and paint are added to the product. A brief 4-step explanation below this illustration describes how the actual process transforms the hide to the dangerous chew stick. And, below the explanation, we’ve included some safer, healthier treat option suggestions (vegetarian option as well).

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STEP 1: Normally, cattle hides are shipped to tanneries for processing. The hides are treated with a chemical bath to help “preserve” the product during transport to help prevent spoilage.

Once at the tannery, the hides are soaked and treated with either an ash-lye solution or a highly toxic recipe of sodium sulphide liming. This process will help strip the hair and fat that maybe attached to the hides themselves.

The hides are then treated with chemicals that help “puff” the hide, making it easier to split into layers. The outer layer of the hide is used for goods like car seats, clothing, shoes, purses, etc. But, it’s the inner layer that is needed to make the rawhide, and other things like gelatin, cosmetics, and glue.

STEP 2: The post-tannery stage: Hides are washed and whitened using a solution of hydrogen peroxide and/or bleach; this will also help remove the smell of the rotten or putrid leather. (Research also shows that other chemicals maybe used to help the whitening process if the bleach isn’t strong enough.)

STEP 3: Now it’s time to make these whitened sheets of this “leathery by-product” look delicious. So, here is where the artistic painting process comes in.

Basted, smoked, and decoratively tinted products might be any color (or odor) underneath the coating of (often artificial) dyes and flavors. They can even be painted with a coating of titanium oxide to make them appear white and pretty on the pet store shelves.

The Material Safety Data Sheet reveals a toxic confection containing the carcinogen FD&C Red 40, along with preservatives like sodium benzoate. Tracking the effects of chemical exposure is nearly impossible when it’s a matter of slow, low-dose poisoning.

STEP 4: How does it last forever? Because the FDA does not consider these chews to be food, it’s a free for all when it comes to the manufacturers of these leather strips, and the products they may want to add to these chews, to get them to last forever. Any sort of glue may be added here to help ensure they never come apart.

When tested: Lead, arsenic, mercury, chromium salts, formaldehyde, and other toxic chemicals have been detected in raw hides.

Finally, it’s time to package and attach all the glorious marketing labels to the product. The fine print warning is attached with some rawhide products:  “Choking or blockages. If your dog swallows large pieces of rawhide, the rawhide can get stuck in the esophagus or other parts of the digestive tract. Sometimes, abdominal surgery is needed to remove them from the stomach or intestines. If it isn’t resolved, a blockage can lead to death.“

How do proactive veterinarians feel about these chews? This is what world-renowned veterinarian Doctor Karen Becker has to say on the matter:

“The name ‘rawhide’ is technically incorrect. A more accurate name would be processed-hide, because the skin isn’t raw at all. But the term “rawhide” has stuck. Rawhide chews start out hard, but as your dog works the chew it becomes softer, and eventually he can unknot the knots on each end and the chew takes on the consistency of a slimy piece of taffy or bubble gum. And by that time your dog cannot stop working it — it becomes almost addictive.At this point, there’s no longer any dental benefit to the chew because it has turned soft and gooey, and, in fact, it has become a choking and intestinal obstruction hazard.“

An investigation by Humane Society International stated in their report, “In a particularly grisly twist, the skins of brutally slaughtered dogs in Thailand are mixed with other bits of skin to produce rawhide chew toys for pet dogs. Manufacturers told investigators that these chew toys are regularly exported to and sold in U.S. stores.”

Healthy, Safer & Delicious Treat Alternatives, as Suggested by THE NEW BARKER dog magazine.

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  1. Atticus’ Own Pet Products – a variety of delicious treats, chock full of all things healthy, like glucosamine and chondroitin. A super treat to keep you dog’s hips and joints healthy. The jerky is made from USDA-certified, all-natural chicken breast from family farms right here in the USA. In fact, Atticus’ Own Pet Products is headquartered right here in Florida. Grain free. No wheat, corn, soy or additives. In addition to the chicken jerky, Atticus’ Own offers Fish Jerky treats “like heaven in a bag…” A great source of omega-3’s. For dogs and cats. Follow the adventures of Atticus’ Own Gibbs and Sunshine at Atticus’ Own Pet Products. Better yet, order up some treats at http://www.atticusown.com
  2. Earth Animal No-Hide Chicken Chews – 100% USA-sourced chicken, made in the USA.  The chicken has been carefully rolled, cooked and uniquely dried for a one-of-a-kind chew. No hormones or additives. Also available: Beef and Salmon. You’ll find these delicious dog treats at fine Florida dog stores such as Dog Mania & Cats in Dade City.
  3. Al CaBONES – We’ve watched customers load up on these treats, as their dogs just love them. The treats are actually beef marrow bones wrapped in chicken. No additives, preservatives or fillers. All goodness, sourced and made in the USA. Bada bing, bada boom. Trust us. This is a treat your dog can’t refuse. Available at fine independent pet retail stores including Fluffy Puppies in Clearwater and Pet Food Warehouse in St. Petersburg. einsteinpets_ilovelucy
  4. Einstein Pets – What about an alternative for the vegetarian lover?  Einstein Pets uses only ingredients that matter. Ingredients like oats, rich in nutrients. Veggie Time dog treats are made with real carrots, turmeric and chia which promotes heart and liver health. This Sarasota, FL company is turning heads in the pet treat industry with awards from Pet Product News and the Best Brand award from American Choice Awards. You’ll find them at fine independent pet retail stores including Wet Noses, Sarasota; Bark Life, Seminole; Downtown Dogs, Tampa’s Hyde Park; The Modern Paws, Tampa; Wag Natural Pet Market, Tampa’s Davis Island; Earthwise Pet Supply in Gainesville, Valrico, Naples and Jacksonville Beach.

Finally – always supervise your pet when giving any chew treats. It’s also a good idea to check with your veterinarian, especially if your dog is on a special diet.

Sources: Pet nutrition blogger Rodney Habib, Planet Paws, The Whole Dog Journal and The Bark.

THE NEW BARKER dog magazine, established in 2006, publishes quarterly. Each cover of THE NEW BARKER dog magazine features an original work of art by a different Florida artist. For more information, visit http://www.TheNewBarker.com